TC3 Archives | MDTS
Modern Defensive Training Systems

MDTS Training

MDTS is a New York based firearms training and personal protection consulting company. We specialize in pistol, concealed carry, shotgun, carbine, defensive knife, less lethal, physical defense and threat awareness training courses. Mobile training courses are available in N.Y. and abroad. Contact us to host a training course at your range or location. Click logo below to see schedule of classes near you.

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Posts Tagged ‘TC3’

GEAR: RG No VIs Med Kit

Posted on: January 17th, 2014 by admin 1 Comment

NoVIs2

I have been testing out the Rogue Gunfighter No Vis Ankle Medical Kit for a few weeks now. Last year I worked with two different ankle mounted kits with mixed results. One didn’t retain the med supplies well enough and the other was uncomfortable to the point that I would take it off after a couple hours of wear.

NoVIs

The Rogue Gunfighter No Vis Ankle Med Kit is the best I have seen and utilized yet. A number of options are available: You can get just the ankle rig with no supplies or you can get a full blown pre-stocked kit. You can add and choose from hemostatic agents available like Celox or Quikclot. I bought mine without any med supplies choosing to stock the kit myself. At $47 shipped (free shipping) for just the basic ankle rig with no supplies I was a little concerned that the product was over priced, especially after my previous experiences. I can honestly say now, after wearing this rig, that I would have paid more. This is a well thought out, easy to conceal, hold a ton of supplies option that is so comfortable I forgot I was wearing it.

Check out the Rogue Gunfighter No VIs Ankle Med Kit if you EDC any kind of personal medical gear. Highly recommended.

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MDTS Update: Courses Added

Posted on: January 5th, 2014 by admin No Comments

FirstAid

 

MDTS has offered our In-Extremis Personal Medical block of instruction as a module or add-on course in classes since 2009, its nothing new. By request from clients, this year we will be offering that information in two stand-alone courses as well.

 

Check them out and keep an eye on the schedule page:

In-Extremis Medical Seminar

In-Extremis Medical Skills 

 

 

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In-Extremis Medical Skills

Posted on: January 5th, 2014 by admin 1 Comment

The In-Extremis Medical Skills course provides instruction and hands on drilling focused on treatment of traumatic injuries within a compressed time frame. Traumatic, life threatening injuries can happen anywhere, anytime. Having the knowledge and skills to provide immediate, life-saving aide to yourself or someone else is essential for the armed citizen or law enforcement officer. In this course an emphasis is placed on injuries associated with personal protection, shooting and firearms utilization on and off the range. This course is recommended for Armed Citizens and Law Enforcement Officers.

 

Course content will include but is not limited to:
In-Extremis Medical Mindset
Life Threatening Injuries:
-Hemorrhage, Penetrating Trauma, Lacerations, Blunt Force Trauma
Contacting & Communicating with Authorities
Individual Medical Kit (IMK) and components and placement
Individual Assessment Procedure
Types of Bandages and Hemostatic Agents
Types of Tourniquets
Gunshot & Puncture/Stab Wounds
Sucking Chest Wounds
Life Threatening Bleeds
Wound Packing
Dry-Fire and Live Fire Practical Drills & Scenarios

 

Equipment List:
Serviceable handgun, Every Day Carry (EDC) or duty gear, 150 rounds of ammunition, eye & ear protection, weather appropriate clothing, footwear suitable for range, note taking material, any personal medical gear you currently own, water/hydration

*Contact us today if you would like to host MDTS at your range, training facility or come to us here in the Mohawk Valley region for one of our In-Extremis Medical Skills courses. We have range and classroom facilities available that can accommodate large groups (12+), semi-private (2-4) or private training (1 on 1).

 

 

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In-Extremis Medical Skills Seminar

Posted on: January 5th, 2014 by admin 2 Comments

*This seminar is for informational purposes only and follows Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) best practice guidelines. This is not a certification nor does it grant permission to apply the skills and information presented. That decision and responsibility rests solely with the individual or operator.

 

The In-Extremis Medical Seminar presents information focused on helping yourself or someone else with traumatic, tactical related injuries within a compressed time frame. Having the knowledge and skills to provide immediate, life-saving aid to yourself or someone else is essential for the armed civilian or law enforcement officer. For this seminar an emphasis is placed on injuries associated with personal protection, shooting and firearms utilization on and off the range. This course is recommended for Range Safety Officers, Range Owners, Armed Civilians and Law Enforcement Officers.

 

Seminar content will include but is not limited to:
In-Extremis Medical Mindset
Life Threatening Injuries:
-Hemorrhage, Penetrating Trauma, Lacerations
Contacting & Communicating with Authorities
Individual Medical Kit (IMK) components and placement
Individual Assessment Procedure
Types of Bandages, Pressure Dressings and Hemostatic Agents
Types of Tourniquets
Types of Wound Seals
Practical Drilling

 

Equipment List:
Note taking material, casual clothing, EDC gear/set up (no live firearms), any personal medical gear you currently own, water/hydration

 

*Contact us today if you would like to host MDTS at your range, training facility or come to us here in the Mohawk Valley region for one of our In-Extremis Medical Seminar. We have range and classroom facilities available that can accommodate large groups (12+), semi-private (2-4) or private training (1 on 1).

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In-Extremis Medical

Posted on: October 25th, 2013 by admin No Comments
Med1

For range, vest with Specter Gear PFC TQ Tri-Fold holder

 

It’s becoming more and more common to see shooters on the range with some type of small, portable, on or off-body personal med kit. This is a good trend brought on by the advent of excellent tactical medical training knowledge transfer and training courses from companies like Lone Star Medics, Dark Angel Medical or Active Response Training.

 

Having a tourniquet or hemostatic agent on you or in your range bag while shooting at the range, in a class or at a competition is a good idea. Having the skills to utilize those supplies is critical in order to be prepared for when the time comes. If you haven’t received some type of medical training such as CPR, Basic First Aid, EMT or Tactical Trauma Care, go get some. It’s more likely you will need these skills sometime in your life than you will need gun-fighting skills.

 

In very generalized terms, for trauma care such as a penetrating trauma like a gunshot wound, stab or even a severe laceration, consider carrying:
1) A tourniquet
2) Pressure Dressing
3) Hemostatic Agent

 

Med5

Comfort must be considered when carrying med gear on body. The TacMed Tourniquet Holster and 1110Gear Kydex Tourniquet pouch are two EDC options which have pro’s and con’s.

 

Are there other items you could pack into a bag? Sure, however, these supplies should be readily available as part of your every day carry gear which means they need to be compact and comfortable to carry. The TacMed Tourniquet Ankle Holster is a decent, low profile tourniquet (and possibly other gear) carry option. Similar to an ankle holster for a pistol, it utilizes a stretchable cuff with a small pocket and hook and loop velcro closure to secure. While very concealable, this option requires pressure from the cuff being tightened to secure whatever items being carried. In the pic above I have a SWAT-T tourniquet and vaseline impregnated gauze patch.  The 1110Gear.com Kydex tourniquet pouch with tek-lok belt attachment is another option. This pouch holds the tourniquet in a vertical position similar to a pistol magazine. Extremely secure and very well made, the only concern for me is how thick the pouch is, standing off the belt line almost 3inches at its widest point. This makes concealment of this pouch less than optimal in warmer climates/seasons where thin or light weight clothing is worn. Some additional items may include an Asherman/Hyfin Seal for penetrating trauma, nasopharyngeal airway, sterile gloves, pneumothorax decompression needle and shears but once again, training in how to use all of these items and an effective way to carry them need to be investigated thoroughly.

 

Med2

Center console is a good place to store easily accessible in-extremis med gear

 

One area to consider packing/prepping with the trauma care gear listed above is in your vehicle. We spend a lot of time in and around our vehicles; commuting to work, running errands, taking kids to sports practice, etc. Because of this, the likelihood of getting into some type of car accident is higher than the chance of getting into a gunfight. Having gear readily available to treat traumatic injury to yourself or a passenger makes sense.

 

Med3

Door storage is possible but may be inaccessible if door is impacted and collapsed

 

Some considerations:

  • Make sure med gear is available to all passengers, when possible, place equipment somewhere centerline of the vehicle
  • A center console is less likely to be compacted/crushed during an accident. Impacted side doors can make it difficult to retrieve gear from storage areas.
  • Be redundant and pick multiple locations in the vehicle to stow gear
  • Have gear that can be easily carried away from the vehicle, perhaps to another vehicle or in case you have to walk

 

Med4

Have extra med gear in a Get Home/Bug Out Bag that can be easily carried away from the vehicle

 

Recommended basic Med Gear for traumatic injury:

CAT-T Tourniquet

SOFTT Wide Tourniquet  

Israeli Bandage Pressure Dressing 

QuikClot Combat Gauze

 

LBV Attachment:

Specter Gear PFC TQ Tri-Fold

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