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MDTS is a New York based firearms training and personal protection consulting company. We specialize in pistol, concealed carry, shotgun, carbine, defensive knife, less lethal, physical defense and threat awareness training courses. Mobile training courses are available in N.Y. and abroad. Contact us to host a training course at your range or location. Click logo below to see schedule of classes near you.

Posts Tagged ‘pistol’

TacTrainers Metal Airsoft Targets for Home Practice 

Posted on: September 5th, 2016 by admin No Comments

TacTrainers Metal Airsoft Targets for Home Practice

TacTrainers Metal Airsoft Targets for Home Practice in the garage. This is a quick pistol practice session with Matt utilizing Tactrainers metal Airlift targets. I saw friends Shawn and Jordan using them via social media so decided to pick some up. It was a great  investment that added to daily dry-fire micro practice sessions a couple times a week should help me stay proficient and improve.

These reduced size heavy metal targets are cheap, easy to assemble and provide visual and audible feedback. As a result, you get a very similar experience to shooting real steel targets. For safety, eye pro is a must as the Airsoft pellets fragment and come back at you.

Thanks guys for pointing these out to me. You can check out Tactrainers online over on YouTube and on Facebook.

 

MDTS Course Schedule

How to Clear Pistol Malfunctions 

Posted on: September 5th, 2016 by admin No Comments

How to Clear Pistol Malfunctions

 

Video and guidelines on clearing pistol malfunctions.

Note, this is done with dummy rounds. NO LIVE AMMUNITION is in the room.

If you choose to practice these verify the handgun is safe and clear by visually and physically checking it at least twice. Make sure no live ammunition is in the room you are practicing in. Verify you are using dummy rounds by checking each individual round.

 

 

How to Clear Pistol Malfunctions considerations and study guidelines:

General

Diagnostic vs. non-diagnostic assessment i.e. look at gun or work off what gun does or doesn’t do?

Will clearance method work in dark, on the move, with one hand (cred @heybminus)?

Are you just shooting or are you fighting? Is time a factor?

Aggressive manipulation of pistol allows extractor, ejector and recoil spring to do jobs most effectively.

Turning pistol so ejection port faces ground allows gravity to assist clearing any spent casings or debris.

Correct gear and pistol modifications can assist clearance such as mag extensions, enlarged mag base plates and grip mods.

If time not a factor(shooting)then all pistol malf’s can be remedied, with the exception of the failure to unlock, by unloading pistol all the way and reloading. For failure to “unlock” wherein magazine is removed and slide cannot be locked to rear, grasp top of slide with support hand firmly and with web of firing hand strike the tang or beaver tail of pistol to “unlock” then lock slide rear.

If time a factor (fighting) remediation is broken into Immediate Action (rapid fix) and Remedial Action (possibly more timely fix).

 

Immediate Action & Remedial Action

Immediate Action(IA)=robustly tap base plate of mag,assuring proper seating of mag and aggressive reciprocation of slide (rack). This method works to fix gun out of battery, failure to feed/fire, failure to eject (stovepipe) and any debris lodged in ejection port.

Remedial Action(RA)=when gun, gear and operator hand strength will allow, engage mag release, rip mag out of gun, reinsert mag and reciprocate slide. This works to fix linear malfunctions/failure to extract (double feeds). IF mag cannot be removed in an efficient manner then lock slide to rear, remove magazine, reciprocate slide (more than once) and reload

Quick Reference -If gun does not shoot when trigger pressed then IA= tap+rack. IF IA didn’t work then RA=rip mag out-reinsert+rack or lock-rip-rack-reload. When slide won’t move to rear then web hand strike to tang. If out of battery then tap rear of slide with palm or tap+rack.

 

Dummy rounds used here, clear guns and remove live ammo from room.

 

MDTS Course Schedule

Pistol Training & Practice

Posted on: September 2nd, 2016 by admin No Comments

A quick post expressing my personal feelings regarding firearms instruction, an “instructors” responsibility and efforts to stay proficient via training and practice.

TRAINING & PRACTICE: Practical Pistol Skills 1, Marietta NY. I won't ask you to do something I won't do myself. It's important to me that I demo each drill in front of everyone and sometimes actively participate in the class alongside the clients. It's important that clients see me doing what I expect them to do, to lead by example. This is also an opportunity for me to get some practice in. Due to my schedule I don't get to the range to practice as often as I'd like so I rely heavily on dry-fire at-home and while traveling. Shooting in classes tells me where I'm at. Every round, every execution of a mechanical skill has purpose and meaning, it tells me something. It doesn't matter to me what I used to be able to do or what I did yesterday, what matters is what I can do today or tomorrow. I make mistakes sometimes and that's a good thing. Training and practice is where we CAN and should get it wrong. It's through repeated training & practice that we learn, develop and maintain a consistent, repeatable and on demand level of skill so if the time comes to do it for real we are as close to ready as possible. Yesterday is irrelevant. What can you do today, what will you be capable of tomorrow? Go train. #picoftheday #pistol #practicalpistolskills #mdtstraining

A photo posted by MDTSLLC (@mdts_training) on

Firearms Training Feedback

Posted on: September 2nd, 2016 by admin No Comments

A little feedback from a client who attended one of our firearms training classes in the Syracuse, NY area.

Concealed Pistol Low Light Skills

Posted on: November 25th, 2014 by admin No Comments

This course takes your Concealed Pistol Skills and applies them in a low/no light environment. This course will provide attendees with the most up to date concepts and strategies for effectively controlling their environment and potential unknown contacts, attackers or home invaders with light. In this course students will learn concepts of firing, manipulating and operating a firearm with and without a flashlight in a low/no light environment. A number of low light skills will be presented and practiced via force-on-target drilling. Modifiers will be introduced to simulate realistic stress and environmental considerations such as movement and verbal interaction with an unknown contact then drilled extensively. Finally, attendees will engage in force-on-force scenarios testing fundamental decision making, core skill sets and the attendees ability to deal with possible real life situations in reduced or no light. This is the closest you can come to an actual gun-fight or a critical personal protection incident in a safe environment. There is NO LIVE FIRE IN THIS COURSE AND A PISTOL LICENSE IS NOT REQUIRED. It is strongly suggested that you attend this course with a spouse, partner or other family member since they will likely be the only “Help” you will have until authorities can respond.

 

This course is a combination of lecture, discussion, dry-fire drilling, force-on-target drilling and force-on-force scenarios. It is recommended for both new and seasoned gun owners/carriers due to the dynamic, self evaluation benefits associated with this type of training. *For safety reasons this course is limited to 10-12 participants depending upon range or facility.

 

Course content will include but is not limited to:
Firearms Safety/Training Safety
Illumination Tools and Tool Selection
Low Light Shooting Techniques
Use of Ambient Light Sources
Target Identification and Engagement
Proper & Improper Lighting Methodologies
Low Light Problem Solving & Strategies
Force-On-Target Drilling
Force-On-Force Scenarios
 

Equipment List:
Pistol simulator – blue gun, red gun, SIRT Trainer or airsoft pistol (we will have a number of pistol simulators available but may not have one that is identical to your personal carry firearm), comfortable clothing or duty uniform, paintball mask (these can be found at WalMart or Dick Sporting Good stores),  sturdy belt & strong side holster that replicates your every day carry set up and fits your airsoft pistol, eye protection, weather appropriate clothing, hydration, note taking materials and cover garment.

 

NOTE:
Airsoft pistols, SIRT Trainers, Blue Guns and both inside and outside the waistband holsters and face masks will be provided but supplies may be limited, it is strongly recommended you utilize any equipment that best replicates your daily carry gear.

 

****Contact us today if you would like to host MDTS at your range/facility or come to us here in the Mohawk Valley region for one of our Concealed Pistol Low Light Skills courses. We have range and classroom facilities available that can accommodate large groups (12+), semi-private (2-4) or private training (1 on 1).

Concealed Pistol Skills

Posted on: November 25th, 2014 by admin 2 Comments

The MDTS Concealed Pistol Skills is a force-on-target, force-on-force and scenario based course focused on the essential elements of concealed carry. A number of concealed carry skills and fundamentals of precision and combative marksmanship will be presented and drilled via force-on-target. Modifiers will be introduced to simulate realistic stress and environmental considerations such as movement and verbal interaction with an unknown contact then drilled extensively. Finally, attendees will engage in force-on-force scenarios testing fundamental decision making, core skill sets and the attendees ability to deal with possible real life situations. This is the closest you can come to an actual gun-fight or a critical personal protection incident in a safe environment. There is NO LIVE FIRE IN THIS COURSE AND A PISTOL LICENSE IS NOT REQUIRED. It is strongly suggested that you attend this course with a spouse, partner or other family member since they will likely be the only “Help” you will have until authorities can respond.

 

This course is a combination of lecture, discussion, dry-fire drilling, force-on-target drilling and force-on-force scenarios. It is recommended for both new and seasoned gun owners/carriers due to the dynamic, self evaluation benefits associated with this type of training. *For safety reasons this course is limited to 10-12 participants depending upon range or facility.

 

Course content will include but is not limited to:
Firearms Safety/Training Safety
Personal Protection & Concealed Carry Mindset
Legal Considerations and Justified Use of Force Overview
Firearm, Clothing, Holsters and Support Equipment Considerations
Communicating with Family, Contacting & Communicating with Authorities
Threat Recognition & Managment
Challenge & Control of Unknown Subjects
Practical Pistol Skills
Concealed Pistol Deployment Skills
Force-On-Target Drilling
Force-On-Force Scenarios

 

Equipment List:
Pistol simulator – blue gun, red gun, SIRT Trainer or airsoft pistol (we will have a number of pistol simulators available but may not have one that is identical to your personal carry firearm), comfortable clothing or duty uniform, paintball mask (these can be found at WalMart or Dick Sporting Good stores),  sturdy belt & strong side holster that replicates your every day carry set up and fits your airsoft pistol, eye protection, weather appropriate clothing, hydration, note taking materials and cover garment.

 

NOTE:
Airsoft pistols, SIRT Trainers, Blue Guns and both inside and outside the waistband holsters and face masks will be provided but supplies may be limited, it is strongly recommended you utilize any equipment that best replicates your daily carry gear.

 

****Contact us today if you would like to host MDTS at your range/facility or come to us here in the Mohawk Valley region for one of our Concealed Pistol Skills courses. We have range and classroom facilities available that can accommodate large groups (12+), semi-private (2-4) or private training (1 on 1).

NEShooters Summit 2014

Posted on: March 14th, 2014 by admin No Comments

This will be five years that I have taught at the NEShooters summit in Pelham, NH. Training conferences like these are an excellent opportunity to sample and attend training on a number of personal protection and shooting oriented topics with some great instructors with varied backgrounds from all over the U.S. It is also a great way to connect with like-minded people while getting some excellent training. Come join us this year.

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Click on image for more details and registration information.

 

 

Extreme Close Quarters

Posted on: March 10th, 2014 by admin 2 Comments

If you carry a firearm on duty or as an armed, responsible citizen, have you considered what it would be like to engage a threat at contact distance? Maybe you’re  thinking that you never allow anyone to get that close because you are always situationally aware and in control of every situation. If  thats your line of thinking then you probably never do things like stand in line at a store, go to a movie, attend a meeting, sporting event or social function. All of these examples place others, often unknowns, within arms reach on a regular basis. The fact is you won’t get to choose when, where or how a violent spontaneous encounter happens, the bad guy does.

Watch this video, study it and consider your current level of training:

 

So what skills will you need to navigate a situation like this? Have you only shot your handgun at paper targets? Have you done any pressurized force-on-force training against a resisting, non-compliant partner or opponent who is actually trying to strike you or take your gun away?

 

 

iPhone Pics 167

 

 

Some considerations:
1) What is your current fitness level? Watch the video again and note how long deputy Mitchell had to grapple with, run from, avoid and fight with his opponent; it was awhile. Do you have gas in the tank for that?  Getting Back Into Shape

 

2) Have you trained and conducted live fire from a viable retention shooting position? Viable meaning you have tested it out with simmunitions or airsoft or marking cartridges or some type against someone trying to muzzle avert you or grab your gun and take it away.

 

3) Where is your support hand when shooting from the retention position? If your support hand is on or near the gun, why? For retention purposes? When the opponent knocks you out because neither of your hands is defending your head no retention position in the world will help you keep that gun. The support hand should be active, up and ready to protect the face, neck and jawline.

Screen Shot 2014-03-10 at 7.18.19 PM

 

 

4) Is the muzzle flat along your side pointed directly at the opponent or angled downward at a fixed, known angle? As seen in the video above and as seen in pressurized force-on-force training the opponent will more often than not close space and attach to keep you in range for their strikes. A natural reaction is to extend the support hand, push danger away or block incoming blows. If your muzzle is flat, or at an unknown angle how will you know if your rounds are going to strike your opponent or yourself? The higher the muzzle of your gun travels the more chance of shooting your support hand during contact AND the higher the muzzle travels the more of your weight goes back on the heels enabling an aggressor with good forward momentum to knock you over and onto the ground.

 

 

5) What will you do if your muzzle is averted or your rounds have minimal effect on your opponent? Do you have standing grappling skills? Are you capable of retaining the handgun against realistic pressure of assault by an aggressive assailant?

 

 

6) What will you do if the handgun malfunctions? At extreme close quarters you may not have time or space to conduct immediate action, tap-rack. Do you have other physical defense skills or knowledge on how to utilize the malfunctioned handgun as an impact tool force option?

 

 

These are just a few things I thought about when I first watched this video. Training and practice shooting at paper targets and steel is fun but if you never test the skills and techniques you have learned against a resisting opponent, its all just theory. Just because something looks good and puts holes in the anatomical target zones of a paper target doesn’t mean it will work in real life. Train a skill, practice that skill and whenever possible, test that skill.

Chris

 

 

New Course – Defensive Fundamentals

Posted on: February 21st, 2014 by admin 1 Comment

MDTS is proud to collaborate with William Aprill of Aprill Risk Consulting to offer our clients the Defensive Fundamentals: Mindset & Techniques course. This 8 hr. program of instruction offers a unique insight into the essential Mindset & Physical Techniques necessary to navigate a defensive shooting. A combination of break out interactive lectures and fundamental pistol operation skills this course provides the end-user with the physical gun-handling skills AND the essential mindset to implement those skills under extreme duress. Understanding yourself, the criminal and the conflict is the focus of this course. How to prepare for and deal with a defensive shooting, before, during and after is essential to WINNING and returning home safe. If you own a handgun for personal defense, in or out of the home, this course is mandatory to your defensive training, development and readiness.

 

Ballistic Radio Interview with William Aprill – 2/16/14 

Ballistic Radio Interview with William Aprill – 7/14/13

 

Course content will include but is not limited to:

  • The 5 W’s of Risk
  • Legalities of Deadly Physical Force
  • Fundamentals of Gun Handling
  • Rapid & Accurate Threat Engagement
  • Emergency Gun Handling
  • Decision Making & Critical Thinking
  • How Criminals Select Victims
  • Deselection Strategies

 

Equipment List:

  • NYS Pistol permit
  • serviceable pistol
  • comfortable clothing or duty uniform
  • 200 rounds ammunition
  • minimum of 2 magazines/speedloader & holders
  • sturdy belt & strong side holster only
  • eye & ear protection
  • weather appropriate clothing
  • hydration
  • note taking materials
  • cover garment

 

NOTES:
*** Contact us today if you would like to host MDTS at your range or come to us here in the Mohawk Valley region for one of our Defensive Fundamentals Courses. We have range and classroom facilities available that can accommodate large groups (12+), semi-private (2-4) or private training (1 on 1).

First time this course is being offered:
Defensive Fundamentals: Mindset & Technique – May 10 – Uniondale, NY

Defensive Fundamentals: Mindset & Technique

Posted on: February 20th, 2014 by admin 1 Comment

MDTS is proud to collaborate with William Aprill of Aprill Risk Consulting to offer our clients the Defensive Fundamentals: Mindset & Techniques course. This 8 hr. program of instruction offers a unique insight into the essential Mindset & Physical Techniques necessary to navigate a defensive shooting. A combination of break out interactive lectures and fundamental pistol operation skills this course provides the end-user with the physical gun-handling skills AND the essential mindset to implement those skills under extreme duress. Understanding yourself, the criminal and the conflict is the focus of this course. How to prepare for and deal with a defensive shooting, before, during and after is essential to WINNING and returning home safe. If you own a handgun for personal defense, in or out of the home, this course is mandatory to your defensive training, development and readiness.

 

Ballistic Radio Interview with William Aprill – 2/16/14 

Ballistic Radio Interview with William Aprill – 7/14/13

 

Course content will include but is not limited to:

  • The 5 W’s of Risk
  • Legalities of Deadly Physical Force
  • Fundamentals of Gun Handling
  • Rapid & Accurate Threat Engagement
  • Emergency Gun Handling
  • Decision Making & Critical Thinking
  • How Criminals Select Victims
  • Deselection Strategies

 

Equipment List:

  • NYS Pistol permit
  • serviceable pistol
  • comfortable clothing or duty uniform
  • 200 rounds ammunition
  • minimum of 2 magazines/speedloader & holders
  • sturdy belt & strong side holster only
  • eye & ear protection
  • weather appropriate clothing
  • hydration
  • note taking materials
  • cover garment

 

NOTES:
* If you have a .22 conversion kit for your pistol you can use it during this course but it is highly recommended you attempt to shoot the majority of the course with your carry ammunition caliber. You WILL need a minimum of 200 rounds of regular ammunition which you will be shooting.

** Lunch is limited to 30-40 minutes max and is often a “working” lunch where discussion of specific aspects related to the days class or a module of instruction is presented. Therefore it is highly recommended you bring a bag lunch.

*** Contact us today if you would like to host MDTS at your range or come to us here in the Mohawk Valley region for one of our Defensive Fundamentals Courses. We have range and classroom facilities available that can accommodate large groups (12+), semi-private (2-4) or private training (1 on 1).

Maximizing the Combat Pistol Grip

Posted on: January 26th, 2014 by admin No Comments

Maximizing the Combat Pistol Grip. Understanding, developing and refining an effective and consistent combat or final firing grip on the pistol are essential to repeatedly engage a designated target with both fundamental (precision) and combative (getting the hits necessary to stop the threat) marksmanship. While a less than optimal grip will allow us to hit a target once, follow-up shots are unlikely to hit where we want without a consistent combat handgun grip. Having worked with a lot of shooters over the last 10+ years, I’ve found that grip and improper trigger management are the two main reasons why people cannot or do not consistently put rounds where they desire…..

Click the picture below to read original article.

I wrote this article in 2010 for the Personal Defense Network. Since I am getting questions about this subject and how we teach the combat grip here it is.

Screen Shot 2014-01-26 at 2.14.32 PM

MDTS Training Pistol Courses

MDTS has become known as one of the premiere professional firearms training and self defense providers in the Northeast. Considered by many to be the “next level” in firearms and self defense training once a handgun license is secured or long-gun purchased. Students and instructors are held to a high standard of proficiency and class tempo is paced at comfortable yet challenging levels. Having worked with 1000+ clients per year since 1998, owner and lead instructor Chris Fry has unique experience presenting information in an easy to learn, practical manner. Clients can expect to improve during a class and have the knowledge to continue improving

Concealed Carry Considerations

Posted on: December 6th, 2013 by admin 1 Comment

A few MDTS Concealed Carry Considerations

 

Why are you carrying a pistol?

 

Are you carrying or want to carry because you just got a new handgun and just want to “strap it on” for the day? Are you carrying because it’s your god given right? Are you carrying because you want to be ready to protect yourself, your family or someone else? Maybe today is the day a guy walks into your store, the office you work at or the mall you are shopping in with your wife. WE don’t get to choose when bad things happen; the criminals, emotionally disturbed, active killers and terrorists do.

 

If you have a concealed carry license and choose to carry your firearm or even a personal defense knife for self defense it’s important the only people who know you are carrying is you, a partner or a family member. The information you present, via how you dress, walk, consistent physical actions (like always adjusting a holster when get out of the car), all give you away to the watchful observer. There ARE watchful observers; other CCW holders, police officers, soccer moms and even a criminal or two.

 

PCC2

That’s quite a lump on his side….

 

 

Think like the bad guy

If you carry concealed, a handgun or perhaps a personal defense knife, do you display an overt signature of readiness to those in your environment? Have you considered what information you present to those observing you? If you were a criminal, looking at potential victims, what intel would you look for? How would you select the victim? Does a gun or knife scare you or are you used to seeing such everyday tools of your trade? Will a handgun taken off an unconscious victim fetch a good price down the street? Can that pocket knife this person has be used to assault someone else you have had your eye on or does the gang need weapons?

Size?
Strength?
Type of clothing?
How they walk – do they exhibit signs of some type of injury?
Do they display signs of readiness or possible resistance like the pocket clip of a knife or a bulge under a shirt or coat?
Do they continually touch a certain area around the waistline?
Which is the victims dominant hand?

 

PCC1

If someone can snap a pic of you this close without you knowing….

 

 

Concealed, open or a little of both 

The image we present to those in our environment is key to successful or unsuccessful concealed carry of any personal protection tool. This image can be broken into (3) categories:

1) Covert – you understand the how, what and why of concealed carry and practice it every time you go out.

2) Overt – you consciously choose to display a force option. This is what Law Enforcement officers do, this is what some advocate as a means to “discourage” criminals from selecting you, this is what open carry advocates do to demonstrate their 2A rights (I will leave that issue for others to discuss).

3) Ignorant – NO IDEA how, what or why to conceal carry and shouldn’t be doing so.

 

Photo 298

 

 

Some Generalized Guidelines for Practical Concealed Carry

 
*Elements of these guidelines adapted from Progressive F.O.R.C.E. Concepts Principles of Concealed Carry

 

Remember – “Possession does not equal proficiency” – Clint Smith

 

  • Carry your gun! It is useless if you don’t have it when you need it
  • Dress around the handgun and check yourself prior to exiting a safe area
  • Limit cover garments to one layer over concealed handgun
  • One of the few elements we have absolute control over in a fight is the equipment we bring to it, choose wisely
  • Firearms must be reliable, serviceable, ready and accessible to both hands
  • The firearms manual of arms should be relatively simple; it may not always be you utilizing it (i.e. wife, son, daughter)
  • Mechanical safeties, slide stop/release, de-cockers should be accessible when operating one handed WITHOUT compromising the final firing grip, strong & support sides
  • Ammunition selected for carry must be reputable, factory loaded defense cartridge compatible with shooter and firearm
  • Holsters should be rigid, secure, familiar and compatible to the carrier’s personal and environmental circumstances
  • At least one illumination tool, a spare magazine and an edged weapon should be available and accessible to both hands
  • As a general rule, primary tools (tools you rely upon to protect your life i.e. – firearm, defensive knife) should be carried at the hips forward. Secondary and tertiary gear carried hips rearward
  • Situational, environmental and physical awareness AND proper concealment are the primary means of handgun weapon retention, you retain the handgun not just the holster

 

 

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Something stands out here to the discerning eye..

 

Is that all?

No. The gun, the holster, on body, off body, body type, belts, environment, placement, mode of dress….. the list goes on.

 

There is a lot more to practical concealed carry for personal protection but probably the most important question you need to ask and ask every time you “gun up”  is – Why am I carrying? We all have our reasons and they are all correct, for us. However, it imperative to remember that your perception of the world, the people around you, may not be the same perception they have. What you see as a “display of rights” may be an invitation for violence or selection. Readiness for any situation includes awareness, willingness and preparedness and they all apply to practical concealed carry.

 

 

 

MDTS Schedule 

Black Friday 10% Off

Posted on: November 29th, 2013 by admin No Comments

Use coupon code BF2013 at checkout to get 10% off all scheduled training classes or gift certificates from the MDTShop! One day only.

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MDTS Pistol Drill Target – “Chase” Drill

Posted on: November 20th, 2013 by admin No Comments

A printable pistol accuracy training target that makes practice fun

 

Some of us here in the Northeast are limited by the rules imposed at our respective range when it comes to firearms training and practice. No rapid fire, no movement, no drawing from the holster. “Change ranges or move” isn’t that easy for people who have established lives, families and jobs in this region of the country or in our home state. The number of ranges is also very limited from county to county, state to state. So, how do we get decent training while adhering to such rules. Here is one solution (I hope to post others over the next few months) that I have found to work well under these restrictive conditions allowing me to work on essential skills and get a decent shooting practice session in vs. just going to the range with no definitive plan of action. That is also worth mentioning; have a plan whenever you go to the range. Ammunition has been limited, prices are high and time is limited. Get the most out of your practice session in the fewest number of rounds.

 

I shot a drill called the “Chase” drill with some friends several years ago (2008?) Wherein one shooter engages a designated target and the second shooter (partner) immediately located and shot the same designated target, attempting to put their round through the same hole as shooter 1. Its a fun drill and has great value in my opinion so I drew up this target, range drill sheet. It can be used for practice in two (probably more) ways:

 

1) As a precision marksmanship practice tool – Start at 2/3 yards and slow fire one precision shot into each triangle then increase distance by one yard. We see in classes that once a little pressure is introduced shooters groupings start to open up, sometimes significantly. So, use this target to practice those marksmanship skills learned in class.

 

2) Chase Drill – as described above, use this target to “Play practice” the chase drill with a shooting partner. Don’t go in any defined sequence if you are the first to shoot. Pick the top right triangle, then a middle one, then one on the far right and so on. Your partner has to locate where your round went and do their best to rapidly place their round right on top of your round. If you miss a triangle the drill begins again and they get to go first. If they miss the hole you punched in the triangle you continue to lead the drill. Have fun and let me know how you do.

 

Printable Chase Drill Target

 

 

 

Multidisciplinary Proficiency

Posted on: November 8th, 2013 by admin No Comments

THE MULTI-DISCIPLINARY PRACTITIONER

MDTS advocates a multi-disciplinary approach to training; we do not have to be an expert at one single skill, but strive to be proficient at certain core personal protection skill sets. The defensive arts for a well rounded practitioner, CCW holder, officer or infantryman comprise numerous disciplines and sub disciplines. How does one maintain proficiency in each discipline while living a normal life filled with family, job, obligations and limited resources? Is proficiency in each discipline important or is just “having a gun” good enough?

 

Screen Shot 2013-11-04 at 9.47.00 PM

 

The Problem
We will rarely have the luxury of knowing what type of combative encounter we may face. If I knew I was going to be in a gunfight I could plan accordingly or avoid the situation altogether. Herein lies the crux of the matter; having the skill sets necessary to deal with a wide variety of situations. Simply having a black belt or possessing a CCW does not prepare you for what you may encounter. One must have variable force options and skill sets to deal with dynamic, changing combative environments. “Specializing” in today’s world could spell disaster.

 

Essential Solutions
Proficiency in 5 core disciplines and their sub-disciplines should be acquired and maintained. Consider these disciplines and how they may apply to you:

 

1) Threat Recognition & Management Skills – TRMS encompasses verbal and physical challenge, diffusion and avoidance skills. This is probably one of the least taught but most utilized and important of all the disciplines. More time is spent talking to known and unknown contacts in our environment than we spend fighting them. This is the most relevant skill in our personal defense profile; on a daily basis this skill set is/will be used more frequently than any other.

 

2) General Physical Preparedness (GPP) – Second on this list simply because possessing the ability to run away from a potential encounter (or endure a prolonged encounter) should be a major tactical consideration. Without a base level of GPP your ability to utilize the skill sets outlined below with the exception of firearms (and that can be argued depending upon range of the encounter) will be severely limited. Some could argue that GPP should be #1 simply because it leads to better health.

 

3) Physical Defense Skills – Possessing the ability to defend oneself unarmed should take precedence over weapon/tool skills. Without unarmed physical defensive skills and the ability to counter sudden spontaneous attacks, the tools we do possess could be quickly nullified. Physical defense skills are often the easiest to find and yet this disciple is overlooked or ignored. This type of training also tends to be much more affordable than other disciplines.

 

Essential Physical Defense Sub-disciplines include:

a. In-Fight-Weapon-Access
b. DefenseAgainstArmedAssailants
c. Grappling/Ground Defense

 

4) Edged/Improvised Weapons Skills – Edged/Improvised Weapons are prevalent, easy to acquire and can be carried in more places than a firearm. They can provide a potential force multiplying option for carry in non-permissive environments (NPE). This is a core discipline due to the affordability of quality edged weapons, ease of concealment/every day carry and the relatively short amount of time it takes to acquire basic defensive proficiency

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5) Firearms (CCW) – Firearms come last in the hierarchy simply because there are non-permissive environments that firearms cannot be carried in or through. A large number of employers  are  NPE’s with more becoming so every day.

 

 

Please note: This is just an example of my personal training hierarchy. The disciplines I feel are essential and the order in which I determine how much of my limited training time is dedicated to each. This hierarchy may be different for you.

 

 

Proficiency or Empowerment
How do we acquire and then maintain proficiency in each of the outlined disciplines? What do you consider proficient? What standards do you hold yourself to? Is training done in an effort to succeed and overcome the strictest of tests and standards or to just slide by because you don’t enjoy training that particular skill as much as another. Do you focus on making training empowering by feeling good about what you have done during a class or training session or is your focus on challenging yourself and attempting to overcome previously set goals; sometimes failing? Step back from your current training regimen and consider where you’re at and how you determine which discipline gets the most attention, training time and duration? Developing a training hierarchy is a highly individual process; setting goals and following performance standards should go hand in hand with the development of a personal training hierarchy.

 

 

To quote veteran Law Enforcement Officer, MMA Fighter & Trainer Paul Sharp:

“Skills degrade under pressure. Train to the highest possible standard; put yourself under pressure constantly and consistently. The rest will work itself out as part of the evolutionary process.”

 

 

Performance Standards and Self Evaluation
Establishing performance standards for a specific discipline should not be a random process or left to the “instructor” to determine if we are good enough. Your instructor won’t be there to help you during a combative encounter. Each of the various disciplines in a personal hierarchy should follow some type of self evaluation process. A base level of proficiency needs to be demonstrated before shelving that skill set to place greater focus on another or seek training in a new discipline outside our core. Each core skill set must be trained under fixed conditions and then move into more complex multi-task, multi-variant combative simulations or conditions. For this article the standards I provide below are “generic”. Adhere to some type of self evaluation on a consistent basis or risk stagnation and/or skill loss. What these generic standards won’t evaluate is your ability to make applicable use of force decisions.

 

There is no such thing as “good enough”, there is always room for improvement.

 

 

Threat Recognition Standards – TRMS skills, like all others, need to be trained into a conditioned response; yelling verbal commands at a paper 2D target is not enough. Training must be conducted vs. a live, moving, speaking opponent. Key challenge phrases need to be ingrained and easily issued without conscious thought. Once this can be done, on command, while multi-tasking (moving and/or accessing a tool at the same time) you have met the first standard and can proceed to scenario work.

 

 

 

GPP Standards– This is a highly individualized area but there are some specific standards we can strive to achieve which will help us determine how much emphasis we need to place on this discipline. One very useful standard I have found is Ross Enamaits burpee test. A burpee is a combination of bodyweight exercises which tax your strength, endurance and anaerobic capacity when done in high repetitions. Ross’s standard is 100 burpee’s in 10 minutes for an average person or athlete and 5-7 min. for elite athletes. Because the burpee is a multi-body part exercise, working the upper body and lower body, the cardiovascular system and requires no special equipment the burpee excels as a personal training modality and evaluation tool. Other GPP standards include any of the LEO/MIL Personal Fitness Tests which are numerous since each unit/agency usually has their own. A good resource to follow is Ace Any PFT – Stew Smith . Stew Smith is a former NSW Operator who now specializes in physical training and preparedness. Once a basic PFT score is achieved then GPP training can be conducted 2-5 times/week to maintain this level and focus can be shifted to other core disciplines/sub-discipline or a new discipline.

 

 

Physical Defense Standards – While some have and do achieve a black belt in one style or martial system in 1.5 years others have been studying a martial system for 12 and still have not achieved this rank. Rank and meeting standards is not the same thing. Formal ranking in martial arts is highly subjective and simply achieving a black belt or instructor credentials does not mean fighting is known, mastered or that one is proficient at personal protection. Physical defense standards should follow a more objective path. Specific categories of unarmed physical defense should be outlined, trained and then pressure tested. If the pressure test is successfully navigated on a consistent basis from variable opponents within the context of criminal assault then proficiency has been demonstrated. Simply rehearsing a pre-arranged set of movements against a pre-arranged set of attacks (stimulus-response) is not demonstrable of skill under pressure or presented in a realistic manner.

 

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For Physical Defense a core set of skill sets and sub-sets must be demonstrated:

1) Effective Default defense against spontaneous/ambush attacks. Trained solo and with partners and then pressure tested via moderate to full force spontaneous attack scenarios vs. single and multiple aggressors

 

 

2) Demonstration of Speed and Power for a limited number of “Hard Skills” – These skills may include chin-jab, elbow strikes, axe hand, knee strikes, kicks, jab/cross etc. (Specific skills are left to the trainee and or trainee’s coach/instructor to determine). This demonstration can first be performed on focus pads/shields then pressure tested via force-on-force drilling against padded assailants and finally through moderate to full contact sparring wherein only specific techniques are utilized thus demonstrating the ability to apply a skill on demand and during varying circumstances

 
3) Standing Grapple/Clinch – the same hard skills trained at range from your opponent are often difficult or impossible to apply while clinched or engaged in standing grapple. (This is why boxers often close and clinch to rest or weather a barrage of strikes from an opponent). Again, clinch skills are trained and proficiency is demonstrated via the ability to move in and out of and maintain control while in this range at will during moderate to full force sparring. This range may also include defense against and application of grabs and holds

 

 

4) Counter Take Down – the ability to negate an opponent’s ability to tackle, throw, or pull to the ground. Standards are met when one can consistently negate these attempts during alive, dynamic drilling and moderate to full force sparring against opponents knowledgeable and trained in these types of assaults

 

*In-Fight-Weapons-Access, Defense against Armed Assailants and Ground Grappling are sub-disciplines; separate entities requiring specific time and focus. They fall under Physical Defense because they are a natural extension of practical unarmed combat and beyond the scope of this single article.

 

 

Edged/Improvised Weapons Standards (EIW) – EIW standards begin with demonstrating a basic ability to access a specific tool (In-Fight-Weapon-Access). This skill must be repeatable under dynamic aggression and or moderate to full force drilling, scenarios, sparring. Demonstration of edged weapon hard skills such as movement off lines of attack, basic angles of attack, thrusts, slashes, strikes and combinations of above both solo and under pressure of attack

 

 

Firearm Standards (CCW) – Similar to EIW the ability to access the concealed (or stored) carry firearm solo and then under pressure of attack is fundamental may supersede even marksmanship. Fundamental, precision marksmanship standards such as 2 rounds into a 2 inch circle from 3, 5 and 7 yards with and without time pressure (timed drill). Combative marksmanship standards include 2 rounds in a 3×5 index card from variable distances under time pressure from in and out of the concealed holster, varied ready positions and varied body positions. Dynamic movement standards from in and out of the holster engaging an 8-10 inch center of visible mass target under time pressure while moving off line of attack in varied directions. Proficiency for all of the above demonstrated via square range drills PRIOR to engagement in live force-on-force scenarios and drills. A couple excellent resources which I have found useful in developing my personal standards include J. Michael Plaxco’s book “Shooting from Within” and Pat Rogers MEU-SOC Pistol Qualification course (page 2).

 
Hold yourself to some performance standard and train the skills you need work on based upon self evaluation of those standards. Fill the holes in your personal defense profile before someone discovers and exploits them.

 

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True Multidisciplinary Proficiency
Rarely do we see multiple core disciplines trained in the same class or during the same workout. If we may have to traverse a force continuum ranging from verbal challenge to unarmed contact and perhaps even lethal force via the use of a firearm, why do we train them all separately? Secondly, can’t we cover a broader range of skill sets in one workout thus managing time and resources and accomplishing more if we batched several disciplines together? Is having the ability to transition from one discipline to another under pressure more important than any single discipline individually? True multidisciplinary proficiency is demonstrating that you possess a standard knowledge of each core discipline and you can seamlessly transition between each during a dynamic combative encounter. There are some good multidisciplinary or commonly referenced “integrated” training programs available such as those offered by SouthNarc, Progressive F.O.R.C.E. Concepts or Sharp Defense. Take a hard, honest look at what you are currently doing and why. Haphazardly jumping around from class to class or from skill set to skill set without reason or method is a sign of poor planning and preparation. A combative encounter may be completely random, preparation and training should not be.

NOV/DEC/JAN Schedule

Posted on: November 4th, 2013 by admin No Comments

Updated schedule for Nov/Dec/Jan, check it out and get in while you can.

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I am often critical…

Posted on: October 15th, 2013 by admin 1 Comment
Hey Chris,

 

My name is Robert I was at the course this past weekend.

 

I have been involved in self defense for many years, I have trained in many disciplines since I was a kid, about 10 years ago I became involved with RBSD, I have trained in Senshido, Blauer Tactical, Attackproof and many other’s.

 

So now that you know my experience you can appreciate my comments. This was my first live fire pistol course and I thought it was perfect, it was exactly the introduction a person should have into using a handgun. Your analysis of pre-contact psychology, while brief was right on, I can see you have plenty of experience in adrenaline stress conditioning and response and have done plenty of research on the realities of violence.

 

I am often very critical of people who claim to be experts in self protection especially when they neglect to address the myriad of things that occurs prior to a confrontation (Preparation, Avoidance, Awareness, Escape, De-escalation). Individuals who only focus on the physicality of violence and the Technic’s are missing out on the strategies and tactics that setup conflict resolutions before they even start.

 

The fact that you could summarize these things quickly and succinctly showed that you had a high level of understanding in this area. I did catch a few references to NLP/NAC which I thought was pretty cool too, I’m a big fan of communication, I think listening and understand what others are saying is a lost art.

 

One thing I found especially important was when you briefly discussed associating with the attacker and speaking their language, creating a rapport with them. Most RBSD training looks down on demonstrative behavior during the de-escalation stage (except Geoff Thompson), which may work in many places but I think in New York it’s a little different, I feel like you can always backpedal from being assertive by apologizing but responding to confrontation from timidly sets the tone for the engagement, it creates the predator/prey paradigm where you are on the prey end of things.

 

Honestly I could go on and on about RBSD but I’m sure I’ve already killed a lot of your time. I could easily point out 100’s of things I enjoyed about your training. However I will finalize with this, in terms of shooting skill, when I first shot the SDR HI, I hit 2 center mass effectively and 2 left of the eye box (temple and check area). After going over sighting, grip and trigger control and the training you provided I witnessed immediate improvement’s. During the draw stroke live fire exercise I was shooting 45 cal bullets through their own holes in the center of the eye box, even the guy Rob and Jeff to my right were complimenting me on how nice the hole was in the paper. A big difference from the first set of exercises where there were many magic marker circles on my paper. So I can point to a direct result of your training and for that I thank you and I’m glad you came down to LI for the day.

 

Similarly your staff was great, Rob was very helpful and knowledgeable as well, I would also like to mention Tom, he was amazing, he displayed a tough exterior but I noticed him constantly showing high levels of generosity, he offered anything he had from advise to drinks to help out a group of strangers (well half were strangers).

 

Overall I really associated with your training, it falls in line with a lot of the research I have done myself and I found it to be very accurate. Well I feel like I’ve blown a lot of smoke up your ass, but the truth is most people haven’t done the research and don’t truly understand violence and at a glance I can tell that you have put in the time and I appreciate that.

 

Thank you,
Robert M., Farmingville NY