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Modern Defensive Training Systems

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MDTS is a New York based firearms training and personal protection consulting company. We specialize in pistol, concealed carry, shotgun, carbine, defensive knife, less lethal, physical defense and threat awareness training courses. Mobile training courses are available in N.Y. and abroad. Contact us to host a training course at your range or location. Click logo below to see schedule of classes near you.

Posts Tagged ‘concealed carry’

MDTS Concealed Carry Principles

Posted on: September 5th, 2016 by admin No Comments

PRACTICAL CONCEALED CARRY SKILLS, 9/11, ONTARIO NY. Only a few of these left this year, don't put it off until next year, get into one now! MDTS Principles of Concealed Carry: 1) "Possession does not equal proficiency” – Clint Smith 2) Carry your gun, it is useless if you don’t have it when you need it. 3) Limit cover garments to one layer over concealed handgun. 4) One of the few elements we have absolute control over in a fight is the equipment we bring to it; be prepared by investing in quality guns and equipment. 5) Avoid purchasing clothing one size bigger to conceal the wrong handgun in the wrong holster for you and your body type. Buy guns, holsters and support gear that fit you, your body type and current clothing choices. 6) Eliminate having to modifying cover garments to aid in clearing garment for access; have one-two robust methods of access that work with any type or garment regardless of design or weight. 7) Firearms must be reliable, serviceable, ready and accessible to both hands. 8) The firearms manual of arms should be relatively simple; it may not always be you utilizing it (i.e. wife, son or daughter). 9) Mechanical safeties, slide stop/release, de-cockers should be accessible when operating one handed WITHOUT compromising the final firing grip, strong & support sides. 10) Ammunition selected for carry must be reputable, factory loaded defense cartridge compatible with shooter and firearm. 11) Holsters should be rigid, secure, familiar, compatible to the carrier’s personal and environmental circumstances and allow one handed re-holstering. 12) At least one illumination tool, spare magazine, edged weapon and tourniquet should be available and accessible to both hands. 13) As a general rule, primary tools (tools you rely upon to protect your life i.e. -firearm, edged weapon) should be carried at the hips forward. Secondary and tertiary gear carried hips rearward. For defensive purposes a gun is only as good as you are at accessing and presenting it, under pressure. 14) Environmental awareness, situational awareness, physical awareness and proper concealment are the primary means of handgun weapon retention. #picoftheday #mdtstraining

A photo posted by MDTSLLC (@mdts_training) on

 

MDTS Concealed Carry Principles:

General

“Possession does not equal proficiency” – Clint Smith

Carry your gun, it is useless if you don’t have it when you need it.

One of the few elements we have absolute control over in a fight is the equipment we bring to it; be prepared by investing in quality guns and equipment.

As a general rule, primary tools (tools you rely upon to protect your life i.e. -firearm, edged weapon) should be carried at the hips forward. Secondary and tertiary gear carried hips rearward. For defensive purposes a gun is only as good as you are at accessing and presenting it, under pressure.

Environmental awareness, situational awareness, physical awareness and proper concealment are the primary means of handgun weapon retention.

Clothing

Limit cover garments to one layer over concealed handgun.

Avoid purchasing clothing one size bigger to conceal the wrong handgun in the wrong holster for you and your body type. Buy guns, holsters and support gear that fit you, your body type and current clothing choices.

Eliminate having to modifying cover garments to aid in clearing garment for access; have one-two robust methods of access that work with any type or garment regardless of design or weight.

Firearms

Firearms must be reliable, serviceable, ready and accessible to both hands.

The firearms manual of arms should be relatively simple; it may not always be you utilizing it. It may be a wife, son or daughter.

Mechanical safeties, slide stop/release, de-cockers should be accessible when operating one handed WITHOUT compromising the final firing grip, strong & support sides.

Ammunition

Ammunition selected for carry must be reputable, factory loaded defense cartridge compatible with shooter and firearm.

Holsters

Holsters should be rigid, secure, familiar, compatible to the carrier’s personal and environmental circumstances and allow one handed re-holstering.

Support Gear

At least one illumination tool a spare magazine an edged weapon and a tourniquet should be available and accessible to both hands.

 

MDTS Course Schedule

 

Concealed Carry During the Winter

Posted on: December 16th, 2014 by admin No Comments

Cold weather means multiple layers if you are trying to stay warm. These multiple layers can have a significant effect on your every day carry placement and ability to access those tools efficiently. Consider this MDTS principle: limit cover garments of any 1st line personal protection tools to one layer of clothing. One layer is congruent with summer/fall carry for most and won’t inhibit access like multiple, thick layers. Consider the following Principles of Concealed Carry:

 

 

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Concealed Pistol Skills

Posted on: November 25th, 2014 by admin 2 Comments

The MDTS Concealed Pistol Skills is a force-on-target, force-on-force and scenario based course focused on the essential elements of concealed carry. A number of concealed carry skills and fundamentals of precision and combative marksmanship will be presented and drilled via force-on-target. Modifiers will be introduced to simulate realistic stress and environmental considerations such as movement and verbal interaction with an unknown contact then drilled extensively. Finally, attendees will engage in force-on-force scenarios testing fundamental decision making, core skill sets and the attendees ability to deal with possible real life situations. This is the closest you can come to an actual gun-fight or a critical personal protection incident in a safe environment. There is NO LIVE FIRE IN THIS COURSE AND A PISTOL LICENSE IS NOT REQUIRED. It is strongly suggested that you attend this course with a spouse, partner or other family member since they will likely be the only “Help” you will have until authorities can respond.

 

This course is a combination of lecture, discussion, dry-fire drilling, force-on-target drilling and force-on-force scenarios. It is recommended for both new and seasoned gun owners/carriers due to the dynamic, self evaluation benefits associated with this type of training. *For safety reasons this course is limited to 10-12 participants depending upon range or facility.

 

Course content will include but is not limited to:
Firearms Safety/Training Safety
Personal Protection & Concealed Carry Mindset
Legal Considerations and Justified Use of Force Overview
Firearm, Clothing, Holsters and Support Equipment Considerations
Communicating with Family, Contacting & Communicating with Authorities
Threat Recognition & Managment
Challenge & Control of Unknown Subjects
Practical Pistol Skills
Concealed Pistol Deployment Skills
Force-On-Target Drilling
Force-On-Force Scenarios

 

Equipment List:
Pistol simulator – blue gun, red gun, SIRT Trainer or airsoft pistol (we will have a number of pistol simulators available but may not have one that is identical to your personal carry firearm), comfortable clothing or duty uniform, paintball mask (these can be found at WalMart or Dick Sporting Good stores),  sturdy belt & strong side holster that replicates your every day carry set up and fits your airsoft pistol, eye protection, weather appropriate clothing, hydration, note taking materials and cover garment.

 

NOTE:
Airsoft pistols, SIRT Trainers, Blue Guns and both inside and outside the waistband holsters and face masks will be provided but supplies may be limited, it is strongly recommended you utilize any equipment that best replicates your daily carry gear.

 

****Contact us today if you would like to host MDTS at your range/facility or come to us here in the Mohawk Valley region for one of our Concealed Pistol Skills courses. We have range and classroom facilities available that can accommodate large groups (12+), semi-private (2-4) or private training (1 on 1).

Concealed Carry Mistakes

Posted on: September 21st, 2014 by admin No Comments

Probably the single biggest mistake that individuals who carry concealed (guns and/or knives) is “picking”. Frequently touching where the gun is or adjustment of the weapon. This is done mainly as a reassuring gesture or to adjust after changing a position like from sitting to standing.

 

To prevent this the concealed carrier must:

1) have confidence in their safe gun-handling skills, abilities and choice of concealment garments

2) have a comfortable holster or sheath set-up that fits body type

3) have good personal, situational and environmental awareness understanding that you are almost constantly being observed by someone when in public and that police as well as criminals pay attention.

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#MDTS #mdtsconcealmentsoutions #mdtstraining #training #concealedcarryskills #edc

Choosing a Neck Knife for Every Day Carry

Posted on: August 26th, 2014 by admin 1 Comment

Choosing a Neck Knife for Every Day Carry

 

*Please note, it is YOUR responsibility to know and understand the laws regarding carrying a knife. This post is for information purposes only.

 

From time to time I’ve carried a small fixed blade neck knife. It isn’t by any means my go-to method of carry however there are situations such as extreme warm weather climates or certain dress occasions when a neck knife serves a specific carry purpose. Over the years testing and carrying a variety of neck knives I’ve come to a few steadfast and practical considerations when carrying via this method.

Photo 270

Two different neck knives set up with two different lengths of cordage: Left, Emerson La Griffe set up for Long-Carry and Right, CRKT Wharncliffe Minimalist set up for Short-Carry.

 

For the purposes of this article the knife itself is meant for utility or as a defensive tool when the circumstances in which it may be deployed are a reactive, lethal force situation in which my life or the life of someone else is in jeopardy. The neck knife, for that purpose, is being deployed as a last resort. While it would be easy to spend time discussing what knife you should or shouldn’t carry, various makes and models; what is more important, at least to me, is how you carry the neck knife.

It isn’t as simple or easy as throwing it around your neck, tucking it under a shirt and thinking you are ready. Consider needing this neck knife when your awareness has broken down and you are having to utilize it under extreme duress, in close confines and against multiple aggressors.

 

Accessing The Neck Knife

Accessing the neck knife can involve both hands, or, when set up correctly, only one hand. Similar to the draw-stroke when accessing a handgun, one hand may be required to clear a cover garment out of the way while the other hand establishes a fighting grip on the knife. This is almost always due to the length of cordage used. If the cordage or chain is too short, as is typical with most production neck knives, the knife hangs at approximately the base of the sternum or low chest area depending upon the individuals body composition and dimensions.

This short-carry placement requires a two handed access method or the dominant hand alone must climb up and under the shirt a significant distance to establish a firm grip. This, takes both hands out of the fight or traps the dominant hand under clothing. While there are some who have the discipline and time to practice accessing the neck knife rapidly and efficiently from this carry position it has proven, under opposition training to be less than optimal when the aggressor is actually trying to punch you in the face.

 

Photo 263 2

Clearing the cover garment with support hand while establishing a final fighting grip on neck knife with dominant hand. This knife, on a shorter cord, requires both hands to consistently access the knife effectively.

 

Cover Garments

Another problem experienced during opposition testing of the short-carry method was cover garment/clothing related. Stretchy t-shirts were not as big a problem but dress shirts, polo-type shirts and hoodies tended to catch on the backside, around the buttocks when utilizing a two handed upward cover garment clearing method.

 

Limitedbygarment

Note how tight the cover garment is around the hips and buttocks. This tension limits how much the cover garment could be lifted to clear the neck knife for consistent access.

 

An alternative to consider is what I will refer to as long-carry for the neck knife. This is where an extended or longer attachment is utilized to hang the neck knife closer to the belt line. When set up appropriately this places the knife hilt approximately 1-2 inches above the hem of the shirt.

 

Photo 266 1

Note how much lower this knife hangs compared to the one above. Hilt of knife is approximately 1-2 inches above hem of shirt.

This is where other common EDC defensive tools such as firearms or other knives are carried. So, congruency with previously established tool access is achieved. This long-carry position requires very little elevation of the dominant hand to index and acquire a grip. The support hand can be used to assist this process but is not required with practice. In confined space or in a clinched position or bear hug the dominant hand can still grab the neck knife. This even works if the support side hand or arm is tied up fending, striking or grappling.

 

Choosing a Neck Knife for Every Day Carry

Note the locked wrist position when indexing and establishing grip. This makes fouling the draw stroke much more difficult.

 

Choosing a Neck Knife for Every Day Carry

Utilizing the support hand to better visualize the final fighting grip.

 

Lanyards & Attachments

Finally, consider some type of break-away connector or clasp for the attachment. Cordage around your neck during a struggle is a handle for someone to get ahold of and use against you. A break away connector will solve this problem.

 

Photo 271

A simple break-away connector from amazon.com will allow the neck knife cordage to disconnect when aggressively yanked on or pulled.

 

Defensive Knives And Stopping The Threat

NEShooters Summit 2014

Posted on: March 14th, 2014 by admin No Comments

This will be five years that I have taught at the NEShooters summit in Pelham, NH. Training conferences like these are an excellent opportunity to sample and attend training on a number of personal protection and shooting oriented topics with some great instructors with varied backgrounds from all over the U.S. It is also a great way to connect with like-minded people while getting some excellent training. Come join us this year.

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Click on image for more details and registration information.

 

 

Concealed Carry Considerations

Posted on: December 6th, 2013 by admin 1 Comment

A few MDTS Concealed Carry Considerations

 

Why are you carrying a pistol?

 

Are you carrying or want to carry because you just got a new handgun and just want to “strap it on” for the day? Are you carrying because it’s your god given right? Are you carrying because you want to be ready to protect yourself, your family or someone else? Maybe today is the day a guy walks into your store, the office you work at or the mall you are shopping in with your wife. WE don’t get to choose when bad things happen; the criminals, emotionally disturbed, active killers and terrorists do.

 

If you have a concealed carry license and choose to carry your firearm or even a personal defense knife for self defense it’s important the only people who know you are carrying is you, a partner or a family member. The information you present, via how you dress, walk, consistent physical actions (like always adjusting a holster when get out of the car), all give you away to the watchful observer. There ARE watchful observers; other CCW holders, police officers, soccer moms and even a criminal or two.

 

PCC2

That’s quite a lump on his side….

 

 

Think like the bad guy

If you carry concealed, a handgun or perhaps a personal defense knife, do you display an overt signature of readiness to those in your environment? Have you considered what information you present to those observing you? If you were a criminal, looking at potential victims, what intel would you look for? How would you select the victim? Does a gun or knife scare you or are you used to seeing such everyday tools of your trade? Will a handgun taken off an unconscious victim fetch a good price down the street? Can that pocket knife this person has be used to assault someone else you have had your eye on or does the gang need weapons?

Size?
Strength?
Type of clothing?
How they walk – do they exhibit signs of some type of injury?
Do they display signs of readiness or possible resistance like the pocket clip of a knife or a bulge under a shirt or coat?
Do they continually touch a certain area around the waistline?
Which is the victims dominant hand?

 

PCC1

If someone can snap a pic of you this close without you knowing….

 

 

Concealed, open or a little of both 

The image we present to those in our environment is key to successful or unsuccessful concealed carry of any personal protection tool. This image can be broken into (3) categories:

1) Covert – you understand the how, what and why of concealed carry and practice it every time you go out.

2) Overt – you consciously choose to display a force option. This is what Law Enforcement officers do, this is what some advocate as a means to “discourage” criminals from selecting you, this is what open carry advocates do to demonstrate their 2A rights (I will leave that issue for others to discuss).

3) Ignorant – NO IDEA how, what or why to conceal carry and shouldn’t be doing so.

 

Photo 298

 

 

Some Generalized Guidelines for Practical Concealed Carry

 
*Elements of these guidelines adapted from Progressive F.O.R.C.E. Concepts Principles of Concealed Carry

 

Remember – “Possession does not equal proficiency” – Clint Smith

 

  • Carry your gun! It is useless if you don’t have it when you need it
  • Dress around the handgun and check yourself prior to exiting a safe area
  • Limit cover garments to one layer over concealed handgun
  • One of the few elements we have absolute control over in a fight is the equipment we bring to it, choose wisely
  • Firearms must be reliable, serviceable, ready and accessible to both hands
  • The firearms manual of arms should be relatively simple; it may not always be you utilizing it (i.e. wife, son, daughter)
  • Mechanical safeties, slide stop/release, de-cockers should be accessible when operating one handed WITHOUT compromising the final firing grip, strong & support sides
  • Ammunition selected for carry must be reputable, factory loaded defense cartridge compatible with shooter and firearm
  • Holsters should be rigid, secure, familiar and compatible to the carrier’s personal and environmental circumstances
  • At least one illumination tool, a spare magazine and an edged weapon should be available and accessible to both hands
  • As a general rule, primary tools (tools you rely upon to protect your life i.e. – firearm, defensive knife) should be carried at the hips forward. Secondary and tertiary gear carried hips rearward
  • Situational, environmental and physical awareness AND proper concealment are the primary means of handgun weapon retention, you retain the handgun not just the holster

 

 

Screen Shot 2013-12-06 at 7.08.52 AM

Something stands out here to the discerning eye..

 

Is that all?

No. The gun, the holster, on body, off body, body type, belts, environment, placement, mode of dress….. the list goes on.

 

There is a lot more to practical concealed carry for personal protection but probably the most important question you need to ask and ask every time you “gun up”  is – Why am I carrying? We all have our reasons and they are all correct, for us. However, it imperative to remember that your perception of the world, the people around you, may not be the same perception they have. What you see as a “display of rights” may be an invitation for violence or selection. Readiness for any situation includes awareness, willingness and preparedness and they all apply to practical concealed carry.

 

 

 

MDTS Schedule 

Practical Pistol Scenarios

Posted on: November 30th, 2013 by admin No Comments

The MDTS Practical Pistol Scenarios course is a scenario based, force-on-force, self evaluation. A limited number of concepts and skills will be presented and then tested at statistically common gun-fight distances via scripted scenarios. Modifiers will be introduced to simulate realistic stress and environmental considerations. Scenarios test fundamental decision making, core skill sets and the attendees ability to deal with possible real life situations. This is the closest you can come to an actual gun-fight or critical personal protection incident in a safe environment. There is NO LIVE FIRE in this course and it is strongly suggested that you attend this course with a spouse, partner or other family member since they will likely be the only “Help” you will have until authorities can respond.

 

This course is a combination of lecture, discussion,  dry-fire drilling and force-on-force scenarios. Practical Pistol Skills 1 or a similar introductory live fire pistol class is RECOMMENDED prior to attending this course. For safety reasons this course is limited to 10-12 participants depending upon range or facility.

 

Course content will include but is not limited to:
Mindset
Firearms Safety/Range Safety
Justified Use of Force Overview
Response Planning, Individual & Team (Spouse, Son or Daughter) Tactics
Communicating with Family, Contacting & Communicating with Authorities
Practical Structure Movement & Barricading Tactics
Challenge & Control of Unknown Subjects
Force-On-Force Scenarios

 

Equipment List:
Pistol simulator – blue gun, red gun, SIRT Trainer or airsoft pistol, comfortable clothing or duty uniform, paintball mask (these can be found at WalMart or Dick Sporting Good stores),  sturdy belt & strong side holster that replicates your every day carry set up and fits your airsoft pistol, eye protection, weather appropriate clothing, hydration, note taking materials and cover garment.

 

NOTE:
Airsoft pistols, SIRT Trainers, Blue Guns and outside the waistband holster and face masks will be provided but it is strongly recommended you utilize any gear that best replicates your daily carry gear.

 

****Contact us today if you would like to host MDTS at your range/facility or come to us here in the Mohawk Valley region for one of our Practical Pistol Scenarios courses. We have range and classroom facilities available that can accommodate large groups (12+), semi-private (2-4) or private training (1 on 1).