Retention Shooting Considerations | MDTS
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Retention Shooting Considerations

 

Retention Shooting Considerations

 

 

Retention Shooting Considerations: 1) Robust body posture and forward drive. In a contact distance fist fight or wrestling match where goal is to win and or not be taken to ground does body posture matter? Why then is it commonly seen and taught that once a pistol is in hand proper posture is given up, hips pushed forward, upper body leaned back ala the "speed rock"? Will the handgun solve that problem every time, right away? Will you hit them in a vital enough area? Arms length distance, can your muzzle be averted? Can you move/lean backward faster then they can move forward? Do you want to fight from the ground? Are there multiple attackers? Leaning rearward while drawing the pistol is a poor postural attempt to get vital shot placement when sights can't be visualized. See below. 2) Robust single hand draw that works with multiple garment/cover types. The "flip & grip" works great until it doesn't and your gun or muzzle is caught up in the shirt. This is seen frequently in Force-On-Force, at this distance, using that technique. Have a practiced, repeatable single hand draw-stroke that works with a variety of cover garments under a variety of conditions. 3) A fixed KNOWN muzzle orientation. "Floating" the muzzle, attempting to aim or get high, COM hits at this distance by leaning back (see above) is: a) Gambling. You don't have your sights (a lot of people miss WITH the sights, under no stress) and b) Not accounting for what you will be doing with the support hand such as pushing, posting, blocking. Don't know where your muzzle is exactly + support hand thrusting forward to stop incoming aggressive movement = ??. A KNOWN, fixed muzzle orientation may not give those COM hits we are all told to strive for but it will prevent what's described above and it will place rounds on lower torso/upper legs, the area responsible for the attackers forward mobility. This position also keeps muzzle downward when in groups of people. Know your target and it's background. At contact distance the FIRST priority is to get them off/away from you or you away from them.#mdts#shivworks @southnarc @immediateactioncombatives @pointdriventraining @paul.sharp.mma @aprillriskconsulting

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1) Robust body posture and forward drive.

 

In a contact distance fist fight or wrestling match where goal is to win and or not be taken to ground does body posture matter?

 

Why then is it commonly seen and taught that once a pistol is in hand proper posture is given up, hips pushed forward, upper body leaned back ala the “speed rock”?

 

Will the handgun solve that problem every time, right away?

 

Will you hit them in a vital enough area?

 

Arms length distance, can your muzzle be averted?

 

Can you move/lean backward faster then they can move forward?

 

Do you want to fight from the ground?

 

Are there multiple attackers?

 

Leaning rearward while drawing the pistol is a poor postural attempt to get vital shot placement when sights can’t be visualized. See below.

 

 

2) Robust single hand draw that works with multiple garment/cover types.

 

The “flip & grip” works great until it doesn’t and your gun or muzzle is caught up in the shirt. This is seen frequently in Force-On-Force, at this distance, using that technique. Have a practiced, repeatable single hand draw-stroke that works with a variety of cover garments under a variety of conditions.

 

 

3) A fixed KNOWN muzzle orientation.

 

“Floating” the muzzle, attempting to aim or get high, center of mass hits at this distance by leaning back (see above) is: a) Gambling. You don’t have your sights (a lot of people miss WITH the sights, under no stress) and b) Not accounting for what you will be doing with the support hand such as pushing, posting, blocking.

 

Don’t know where your muzzle is exactly + support hand thrusting forward to stop incoming aggressive movement = ??.

 

A KNOWN, fixed muzzle orientation may not give those center of mass hits we are all told to strive for but it will prevent what’s described above and it will place rounds on lower torso/upper legs, the area responsible for the attackers forward mobility.

 

This position also keeps muzzle downward when in groups of people. Know your target and it’s background.

 

At contact distance the FIRST priority is to get them off/away from you or you away from them.

 

We cover contact distance and retention shooting in Practical Pistol Skills 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

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